Suggested Questionnaire for Healthcare and Related Professionals – please share widely

GREAT idea!

Restless Hands

I have heard many complaints from autistic people and other people with disabilities about their struggles in communicating with healthcare professionals, etc.. I propose a simple questionnaire for professionals to use. These would be standard intake questions, and the answers would be put at the front of the patient/client’s chart.

If you like this idea, please take this quick online survey!!!

If I get enough positive feedback, I will try to make this tool become a reality. I don’t know how, but I will try. Please help me spread the word.

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1JB2s5dQxtZNLxP7CwbPFtQzU4-3QT6htxjYNhNpIssA/viewform

(If you have trouble wti the survey, you can also comment here on facebook: https://www.facebook.com/notes/open-discussion-on-autism/suggested-questionnaire-for-healthcare-and-related-professionals/789224341139804)

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Connection

Tears! Happy Tears!

Run Luau Run

fingers_touching

With the onset of middle school, I had to finally give up walking Brooke to her class every morning.

***

We stop at the bottom of the hill, some 50 yards from the entrance to the school.  We give each other a kiss on the cheek and then do something we call the “rollers” where we rub our cheeks together.  I watch, every morning with my breath held, as a little piece of my heart goes running up the hill and off to school.

***

For those of you who have been here from the beginning, or who have an autistic child, you know that Brooke’s attempts at play bids are clumsy and awkward at best, often leaving the recipients of those bids unsure of what to do.  Different kids react in different ways, but often, they will simply look at each other and move on.  I don’t know if…

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extinction burst

Wow.

a diary of a mom

IMG_0922

{Image is a photo that I inadvertently took with my phone. The world looks very different when viewed through an alternate lens.}

Ed note: Last night, I shared a quote on Diary’s Facebook page about the importance of “indulging” Brooke’s scripts. Tomorrow, I will have the honor of sharing an autistic perspective on ABA therapy (and everything but the kitchen sink that falls under the ABA insurance code these days), with a guest poster explaining some of the controversy around it and offering practical help to parents in distinguishing between the good and the really, really not so good stuff out there.

In the meantime, I went into Diary’s drafts folder just now in search of something that I’d written over the summer on a completely unrelated topic. And what did I find there but this. I don’t know why I didn’t post it when I wrote it. Maybe I…

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Losing a Pet in an Autistic Household

Wow.

A Quiet Week In The House

When our beloved seventeen-year-old cat was dying, Tyoma, our autistic son, reacted thus:

“Oh. So, then we’ll get a new kitty.”

No emotional depth. No concern. No sadness.

This did not fool us.

Kitty Pearl filled our son’s daily imaginings. Wobbly scratching posts and sinister-looking grooming contraptions were built in her honor. He wrote her sentimental “I-love-you-kitty” letters and taped kitty-centric schedules near her water bowl. Homemade Kitty Forts stretched across rooms and cluttered staircases.

Kitty Portal

Then there were lists. Page after page of numbered instructions pertaining to the cat:

  1. Pet kitty gently.
  2. Add ice cubes to fresh water.
  3. Brush with the fur.
  4. No pestering.

Tyoma needed to organize his interactions with Pearl, not just to remind him of his duties but also to cope with the delicious and abhorrent impulse to pull her tail.

Pearl’s declining state preoccupied Tyoma later that evening. He spread inky equationed papers on the bed…

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